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Poll Attacks: Florida moves up to No. 3 on one AP Top 25 ballot after double-digit home loss to Florida State

The college basketball season is now seven days old. And though there haven’t been many examples of ranked teams losing to unranked teams, there have been some. Washington upset No. 16 Baylor on Friday. Texas upset No. 23 Purdue on Saturday. And, on Sunday afternoon, Florida State upset No. 6 Florida.

Incredible win for Leonard Hamilton.

His Seminoles held Florida to 28.0% shooting and won 63-51 on the road — which means Michael White’s Gators are now 1-1 with a win over North Florida and a double-digit loss at home to a Florida State team that lost five days ago to a Pitt team that lost two days ago to Nicholls State. As I wrote in Monday morning’s updated Top 25 And 1, that’s rough stuff. And as I also wrote in Monday morning’s updated Top 25 And 1, it makes it tough to know exactly how to handle the Gators in the national rankings.

Should you drop them considerably but keep them ranked?

Should you remove them entirely?

Reasonable minds can disagree on how Associated Press Top 25 voters should’ve handled Florida after a double-digit loss at home to an unranked opponent. But we can all agree no Associated Press Top 25 voter should have moved Florida up after a double-digit loss at home to an unranked opponent, right?

Of course we can!

Because there is no logical reason to rank Florida somewhere on your ballot before last week’s games and then move the Gators up the following week after a double-digit loss at home to an unranked team. And yet that’s EXACTLY what Cleveland.com’s Stephen Means did on his ballot this week — he moved Florida up from No. 4 to No. 3 after a double-digit loss at home to an unranked team.

Presumably, it’s just a careless mistake.

But why are Associated Press Top 25 voters ALWAYS making careless mistakes? I’ve been doing this Poll Attacks column every Monday during the season for years and years and years. And every Monday, almost without exception, there’s a glaring example of something on a ballot that suggests the voter in question has no idea that somebody lost a game it lost or won a game it won. It’s incredible. I’m truly blown away by the fact that I rarely have to look too long to find something inexplicable on an AP ballot.

And with that, I’ll just say see you next week.

Same time. Same place.

And with a similar mistake on some ballot, I’m certain.

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